Steve Khan

Four thirty. I’m a lot like my dad. I listened to two tracks from Steve Khan’s Crossings, which he recorded in the wake of his father’s death. This preoccupation with his dad was why I listened to it. The music is exquisite and theoretical, with Khan’s guitar chords sounding to the ear sometimes like random noise, yet I know that every note was thought about as it was played. Anthony Jackson’s bass work is no less calculated and complex in accompaniment. The overall effect, with Dennis Chambers on virtuoso drums, is a music of such difficulty that it racks my brain, but I can appreciate its beauty even without knowing fully the theory behind it. Khan uses some eerie sounding volume swells on his guitar, and his signal is chorused in stereo. Every chord is carefully chosen, impeccably tasteful. The album was released in 1993, a time when I enjoyed listening to jazz fusion. Hearing it again was to commemorate my own father’s passing twenty years ago. It was an act of projection. It had always impressed me that Crossings was done just after Khan lost his father. Returning to it now is a way of thinking about my dad…